Australian Airshow 2017 – Avalon wrap

Mike Rudd, in his own inimitable style, has produced an excellent short video covering the 2017 Avalon Airshow. Although majoring on the Foxbat Australia display, there are comments from Evektor Aircraft and Sling Aircraft, as well as a selection of interesting people who visited our static display.

As usual, click on the picture or use the following link to see the video: 2017 Avalon Wrap

AeroTV and Aeroprakt A22LS

dennis-at-delandAero-News Network Inc has published a short review of the A22LS (Foxbat) on their YouTube channel AeroTV. Headlined ‘Versatile AND Practical – The All-Seeing Aeroprakt A-22 LSA’  AeroTV’s Tom Patton interviews Dennis Long, Aeroprakt’s USA dealer at the recent Deland Sport Aviation Showcase, held in Florida each year.

The video includes some rather old flying footage of an early Australian A22L, plus some newer video of a glider tug A22LS at Benalla in Victoria.  The report gives Dennis a great opportunity to describe the aircraft and its capabilities – which he does excellently! I must remember some of the phrases he uses to use myself at the upcoming Avalon Airshow. Particularly coming to mind are: “…just the best handling light sport on the field.” And: “…taking off on gravel or sand, it does a very fine job of that because the nose comes up right away and you’re balancing just like a taildragger.”

God job, Dennis!

Foxbat Australia welcomes Ido Segev to the team

welcome-idoHere’s a short video welcoming Ido Segev to the Foxbat Australia team.

Ido is not only a commercial pilot and flying instructor, but also a world champion model aerobatic aircraft pilot. He is also a licensed commercial drone operator and has an RA-Aus Pilot Certificate!

Welcome Ido! I’m really looking forward to working with you at Foxbat into the future.

[Click the link above or on the photo to view the YouTube video]

Ausfly/Ozkosh is coming!

ozkoshThe Ausfly Airshow/Fly-in (now somewhat implausibly renamed ‘Ozkosh’) will soon be with us. The organisers promise an occasion bigger and better than ever, with a flying display on both public days, as well as a myriad of exhibitors from autogyros to biggish single engined GA aircraft and accessories suppliers.

Foxbat Australia will be there, look for us on display site 09 – although, based on the late changes in display sites during the last two Ausflys, you might be better off looking for our distinctive black ‘Foxbat Australia’ teardrop banners!

We are aiming to have a new all-singing, all-dancing A32 Vixxen on display, courtesy of its new owner, who will be pausing at Narromine for a couple of days on his way back to south east Queensland. The aircraft is equipped with a Dynon SkyView System with autopilot and transponder. This will be the 9th A32 Vixxen delivered in Australia.

We are also hoping to have a new Aeroprakt A22LS on display, specified with farmers and land owners in mind. Affectionately dubbed the ‘Kelpie’ (after the famous Australian working dog) this aircraft, produced exclusively for Australian customers, has a number of standard features which will appeal to those using their aircraft to help with stock spotting and managing their property. The main standard Kelpie ‘extra’ is a newly designed metal luggage bin behind the seats, with an external door on the left side (just behind the pilot door) for easy access. The bin can also be accessed from inside the aircraft and will be weight-placarded well above its partner aircraft, the A22LS Foxbat. Other standard Kelpie extras include a UHF radio, operating through both pilot and co-pilot headsets and push-to-talk buttons. This is not a mickey-mouse UHF: unlike many less expensive installations, full intercom functionality is retained even with the UHF in operation, and both pilot & co-pilot can use the UHF as well as the VHF. Adding to the list of standard kit are an Australia Warning Systems 100W siren, ‘tundra’ tyres all round, rubber mud flaps, a sun screen at the top of the windshield and a propeller optimised for take-off and climb.

Best of all, we will be offering a very special price for all Kelpie orders confirmed within 2 weeks after  the Ozkosh event.

The show days are Friday 07 October and Saturday 08 October. Location is Narromine Airport, near Dubbo in New South Wales. Come and say hello – we’d love to see you!

Foxbat flight into bad weather

deteriorating-visHere’s a nice helpful video – experienced Foxbat pilot James Pearce sets out on a trip with his wife to a celebration fly-in in the UK.

Watch how the visibility deteriorates and what James decides to do.

The video is over 12 minutes long but worth sticking with as it shows the visibility gradually reducing in real time. These circumstances are similar to those almost all VFR pilots will experience at some time during their flying. Let James’ experience help you ensure you don’t become a statistic!

As usual, to view, click on the picture or here: Foxbat flies into bad weather

Cross-wind flap settings

Cross windCross-wind limits, final approach speeds and flap settings are some of the most frequently requested information by pilots new (and not so new!) to the Foxbat. So here are a few pointers based on the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) and experience.

Cross-wind limits
Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) regulations stipulate a quoted cross-wind limit based on a ‘reasonably competent’ pilot being able to land the plane safely. This is quite different from the typical GA specification, where most manufacturers quote a ‘demonstrated’ cross-wind limit – which is usually the strongest cross-wind the best factory test pilot can manage!

The A22LS Foxbat LSA quoted cross-wind limit is 14 knots; that is a wind of 14 knots at right angles to the runway, or stronger winds at lesser angles. That is not to say that an experienced pilot couldn’t land the aircraft safely at cross-winds higher than that – indeed, the ‘demonstrated’ cross-wind limit is certainly a good bit higher. However, fly the plane by the book and don’t take risks!

Final approach speeds
The Foxbat POH recommends 49 knots with full flap along the later stages of finals. And that’s at maximum 600 kgs weight; it will clearly need to be slower at lower weights.

For light, low-inertia aircraft like the Foxbat a general rule of thumb is to approach to land at 1.5 x stall speed. Stall speed, at full flap and engine at idle, in the Foxbat is 28 knots. 1.5 x 28 knots = 42 knots, so 49 knots leaves plenty of margin! Without doubt, the Foxbat is very easy to land at the correct speeds – and really quite tricky if you come in at 55, 60 or 65 knots – the aircraft will float and float and respond to every gust of wind while it does so. Just by-the-by, I am appalled by instructors who tell their solo students to approach at 60-65 knots in the Foxbat…and then wonder why they have problems landing. In this case, adding a bit of speed ‘for safety’ in fact probably does just the opposite. Fly the plane by the book and don’t take risks!

Flap settings
The flap limiting speed on the A22LS Foxbat is between 80 and 85 knots, depending on specification. With light winds within 10 degrees of the centreline, it’s fine to use both stages of flap. However, as winds strengthen and/or gain more cross-wind component, the flap setting should be considered more carefully.

There’s another general rule of thumb: for every 5 knots of cross wind, reduce the flap setting by one stage. Thus, with 10 knots or more of cross-wind it’s probably best to leave the flaps up on the Foxbat. However, this does introduce other considerations. First, the stall speed increases without flap, to about 38 knots in the Foxbat. So, using the rule of thumb mentioned above, 1.5 x 38 = 57 knots, so your finals approach speed needs to be adjusted accordingly. Which means the aircraft will land shallower, faster and longer. Nevertheless, the higher speed will give a quicker response to control inputs, allowing slightly quicker corrections to attitude.

My advice: practice cross-wind landings frequently, with and without flaps, until you feel comfortable handling them. You never know when operational requirements or an emergency may need to you get down safely in a cross-wind. Stick to the POH figures and you won’t go far wrong.