Australian International Airshow 2019

Seems such a short while ago that we were enjoying the 2017 Australian Airshow – and yet it’s already 2019 and the bi-annual show is almost upon us again!

Foxbat Australia will, as usual, be exhibiting in the static aircraft area. We are planning to have our new A22LS Foxbat demonstrator there, which is fitted with an AirMaster in-flight adjustable propeller, plus a nice red, highly specified A32 Vixxen. The exact site details have not yet been confirmed but we will publish them as soon as we have them.

Location for the 2019 Airshow is Avalon Airport, south west of Melbourne.

Dates for your diary are: trade days, Tuesday 26 February-Friday morning 01 March 2019; public days, afternoon & evening of Friday 01 March – Sunday 03 March. We will have a limited number of trade day tickets available, with a priority given to existing Foxbat Australia owners – please contact Ido or me if you are interested.

PS – we are expecting a brand new (to the Australian market) low-wing all-metal, 2-seat LSA aircraft to be on display right next to us. This aircraft has a number of unique features and will be available at a very attractive price…

New Foxbat demonstrator flies over 13th beach

Here are a few short seconds of our new A22LS Foxbat demonstrator in flight. After less than a month in the air, it’s already completed 25 hours’ flying and is currently having its first maintenance check.

This is the first Foxbat demonstrator we’ve had which is fitted with an AirMaster in-flight electrically adjustable propeller – this one with Whirlwind blades. We are evaluating the propeller before formally offering it as an option – our first impressions are that take-off distance is shorter, and climb is significantly better than with the standard KievProp; economy is slightly better. We will also evaluate this propeller on the A32 Vixxen in due course, where in addition to take-off and climb performance, we are predicting an improvement in cruise speed.

The demo Foxbat aircraft is also fitted with a glider tow hook and we will be undertaking towing trials in the near future in Victoria, Australia. This aircraft has oversize wheels, a 30kgs ‘Kelpie’ metal luggage compartment with a side door and a ballistic rescue system. The icing on this demonstrator cake is a 2-axis Dynon autopilot which will be connected with a GPS as soon as we can keep the aircraft on the ground long enough to fit one!

Come and see this aircraft along with the A32 Vixxen at the Australian International Airshow, at Melbourne’s Avalon Airport from 26 February to 03 March this year.

As usual, either click on the image above or here to view the video: Foxbat over 13th beach

High risk turns

Here’s a great video by legend Wayne Handley, all about the use of rudder in turns. Although written primarily for ag pilots, the lessons he gives are equally applicable to pilots who often fly close to the ground – for example when stock counting or mustering – or even just the rest of us when we make that last turn at 500 feet on to final approach to land.

His explanation of what causes one wing to stall before the other is excellent, as are his instructions for spin avoidance and wing-drop recovery.

Although posted nearly 10 years ago, the lessons in the video are just as important today as they ever were! Great stuff from Wayne Handley and a quarter hour well-spent!

As usual, to view the Vimeo video, click on the picture or here: Smart Turn by Wayne Handley

What’s in a (Foxbat) colour?

In Australia, Aeroprakt aircraft come in a range of ‘standard’ colours – white, yellow, orange, red and blue. We are lucky in being able to paint our aircraft these vibrant colours – something denied to composite aircraft builders, where differential heating of colours can wreak havoc on the strength of glass fibre and other composites.

Throughout the world, colours can signify different things, often with cultural and other connotations beyond their simple names.

Here are a few thoughts to ponder around the ‘standard’ colours of our aircraft.

Blue – has long been considered a spiritual colour, ‘the vault of heaven’, the colour of the sky. But the use of blue as a colour is comparatively recent in human civilisation, as natural blue pigments are relatively rare in nature. Blue is sometimes called one of the primary colours, although the idea of blue, red and yellow as primary colours is a modern and Euro-centric concept. The ‘classical primaries’ – white, black, red and yellow – excluded blue, which only really arrived in Europe in the 13th century, as ultramarine. Ultramarine was incredibly expensive, being derived from the semi-precious stone, lapis lazuli, and at one time ultramarine was even more valuable than gold. In Australia, blue Foxbats make up about 5% of the fleet.

Red – has been historically associated with aggression and courage. Not for nothing did the soldiers and commanders of the Roman empire wear red. But red can also signify love and fertility. In many countries brides wear red and the colour also signifies good fortune and happiness. In the Christian church, red signifies the blood of Christ; as a result, it was adopted by monarchs all over Europe as a sign of their power, and by merchants as an indication of status. And, as everyone knows, red aeroplanes fly much faster than other colours! In Australia, red Foxbats and Vixxens make up about 10% of the fleet.

Orange – was originally considered to be a shade of yellow by the Egyptians and only became the modern ‘orange’ (from the Sanskrit ‘naranga’) in the mid 16th century. Before that, in China and India, the colour took its name from saffron, not the citrus fruit. In many cultures, orange is considered a colour of spiritual transformation. For example, in Buddhism, orange is the colour of illumination, the highest state of perfection. In western civilisations, orange is seen as a combination of red and yellow, signifying creativity, warmth and change. In Australia, orange Foxbats and Vixxens account for just over 10% of the fleet and growing.

Yellow – in almost all cultures is associated with the sun, with gold recognised as the strongest yellow of all. To the ancient Egyptians, gold represented the flesh of the gods and was thus used extensively to decorate the tombs of the pharaohs. In Greek mythology, the sun-god Helios wore a yellow robe while riding his chariot across the heavens. But yellow also has some conflicts – on the one hand, sunshine, optimism and enlightenment, while on the other, pale yellow has sometimes been used to represent cowardice. But I always think of yellow as the most luminous colour of the spectrum, always attracting the eye to its presence. In Australia, yellow is the most popular colour for Vixxens, and in particular, Foxbats, where it represents over 40% of the fleet.

White – lead white, was in continuous production for over 2000 years. This, the purest of whites, is derived from the oxidation of metal lead into flakes of its oxide, hence the common name of ‘flake white’ in many parts of the world. However, this very toxic lead variant of white has now been completely superseded by non-toxic titanium white. There are almost as many different shades of white as there are stars in the sky. Technically, white is not a colour, as it is a combination of all colours. White usually signifies purity, innocence, and integrity and in western cultures it is common for brides to wear white at their wedding. In the majority of cultures, white also means the beginning of life, and in some it is used as a predominant colour for funerals, intended to signify the end of one life and the beginning of the next. In Australia, white is the second most popular colour for Vixxen and Foxbat aircraft, representing almost 35% of the fleet.

The remainder of our fleet is made up of various other colours – green is in a vivid minority of three, with blue-black, mid-grey, grey & white and dark red having one each.

Having given you some insights into the history and meanings of our base aircraft colours, it probably remains that individual choice of colour for a customer’s aircraft is more dependent on how easily they can be seen in the sky and their partner’s colour preferences! So I think yellow and white will remain the main choice of colour for some time to come – although orange is gaining in popularity all the time.

For more information on the history and meanings of colours, have a look at books like Chromatopia and The Story of Colour

Dan Johnson tests the A32 Vixxen

Light aviation’s guru blogger Dan Johnson grabbed the opportunity to test fly the newest FAA LSA-approved aircraft, the Aeroprakt A32 Vixxen.

Click the photo above or here to see the article and accompanying video: Dan flies the A32

You can read more – much much more – about all manner of light sport, recreational and ultralight aircraft on Dan’s blog: ByDanJohnson.

5 easy steps to change your Foxbat oil

Here’s how to change the oil and filter on your Aeroprakt A22LS Foxbat or A32 Vixxen Rotax 912ULS engine:

1. Prepare for your oil change.
Make sure you have the following items ready:

  • A copy of the current Rotax Line Maintenance Manual for your engine. Whatever else follows, you should observe the requirements of this manual!
  • Three litres of suitable oil – we recommend Shell Sport Plus 4 oil as it is compatible with both unleaded and leaded fuel.
  • A Rotax approved replacement oil filter canister.
  • A fresh copper sealing ring for the oil reservoir drain plug.
  • Lock-wire and lock wire pliers.
  • A pair of side-cutters to remove old lock-wire.
  • 18mm spanner and 17mm spanner or socket to remove the oil reservoir drain plug.
  • 16mm spanner or socket to remove the magnetic plug on the side of the engine near the oil filter. NB> Older engines may have either a hex key or torx socket – check yours first!
  • Torque wrench which covers the range 25Nm
  • A suitable oil filter canister removal and replacement tool.
  • Ideally, a cutting tool to open the old oil filter to check for metal residues. If you don’t have one but know a friendly LAME or L2, they might lend you one.
  • A large container or bucket (with at least a 5 litres capacity) to collect the old oil.
  • Some kind of clean funnel to help you refill the reservoir with new oil.
  • Plenty of old rags to mop up spilt oil.

Then thoroughly warm up the engine – ideally go for a couple of circuits or a 20-minute flight – to ensure the oil is hot and fluid. Do not run the engine inside your shed/hangar!

2. Drain the oil and remove the old filter

The following actions should be completed in a timely fashion, to avoid oil draining out of the hydraulic valve lifters and oil lines. Do not drain the oil and leave (eg) overnight before refilling the next day.

  • After warming the engine, remove the top and bottom engine cowlings. Keep the cowling screws in a safe place. Take off the oil reservoir cap and ‘burp’ the engine several times to ensure all the sump oil is transferred to the reservoir.
  • Place an old oil bucket under the reservoir. Cut off and remove the drain plug lock-wire. Holding the captured nut on the reservoir with a 18mm spanner, use a 17mm spanner to loosen the drain plug. Carefully unscrew the drain plug and remove it together with its copper sealing washer. WARNING! The oil is HOT! Be careful not to drop the drain plug into the oil bucket! Allow at least 15 minutes for the oil to drain out. Remove the old copper sealing ring on the plug and replace with a new one – set the drain plug aside ready for reinstallation. DO NOT MOVE THE PROPELLER WHILE THERE IS NO OIL IN THE ENGINE!
  • While you are waiting for the oil to drain, place plenty of rags or a piece of cardboard under the oil filter to stop oil dripping on to the coolant radiator underneath. Loosen and remove the old oil filter. It contains quite a bit of oil, so remove it as quickly as you can to minimise drips etc onto the coolant radiator. Any oil on the radiator will be blown all over the engine bay when you restart the engine, so it’s important to keep it as clean as possible!
  • Cut and remove the lock-wire and unscrew the magnetic plug in the side of the engine just above the oil filter, using a 16mm spanner.

3. Inspections and records

  • Check the magnetic plug for metal accumulation per the Rotax Maintenance Manual. Some build up of metal particles is acceptable, particularly when the engine is new, as the oil lubricates the gearbox as well as the engine itself. See the Rotax manual for details of acceptable and unacceptable amounts of metal residue. Take a photo of the plug with any metal residue attached and date it for future reference in case you need it for comparison.
  • Clean up the plug with a cloth and some clean fuel and replace it – tighten to a torque of 25Nm. DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN – remember, this is an aluminium crank case and the steel plug can damage the threads if you use too much brute force. Lock-wire the plug, making sure you replace this correctly so that the plug is held tight in the correct sense and cannot come loose!
  • Cut open the filter canister with a suitable tool and extend the paper oil filter on the bench to its full length. Carefully inspect the filter paper on both sides to identify any excessive metal residues. Check the Rotax manual for details of what is acceptable. Ideally, fold up the filter paper and keep it in a sealed and flight time/dated plastic bag in case you need it for reference at some later date.

4. Refill with new oil and install a new filter

 

  • Clean the oil filter contact face on the engine and install the new oil filter canister per Rotax instructions. Smear some fresh engine oil on the rubber washer/seal in the new filter and screw it back in place by hand. After tightening by hand as much as you can, further tighten the filter by rotating about 270 degrees (¾ of a turn). DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN! Wipe away any oil spills around the bottom of the filter.
    Some people like to dab a drop of coloured paint (nail varnish is excellent for this) on the oil filter and housing so you can see at a glance if it has started to unscrew.
  • Clean the area around the oil reservoir drain and re-install the drain plug with its new copper sealer/washer. Hold the captive nut on the reservoir with a spanner and use a  torque wrench to tighten the drain plug to 25Nm. Re-lock-wire the drain plug in place. Make sure you do this correctly so that the plug is held tight in the correct sense and cannot come loose!
  • Fill the oil reservoir with 3 litres of fresh oil. Ensure the ignition is switched off and hand-crank the engine about 20 turns of the propeller (in the correct sense, never backwards!) to help refill the complete oil system. Make sure you replace the oil reservoir cap!

5. Finishing up

  • Remove and/or put away/dispose of all the old oil, filter, tools etc. Don’t replace the engine cowlings yet.
  • Pull the aircraft out of the hangar and ensure it’s well away from anything loose that might get sucked into the prop.
  • Get in and start the engine. Watch the oil pressure gauge to ensure the oil pressure is rising within 10-20 seconds. If not, shut down. Check there is oil in the reservoir. Ensure all switches including ignition, are OFF and, using the propeller blades, hand-crank the engine for 5-10 rotations of the propeller. Restart the engine and adjust to around 2300-2500 rpm.
  • If the pressure still does not rise within 10-20 seconds, shut down and carry out a full check of the oil system to ensure there are no loose hoses and that you did actually refill the oil reservoir!
  • If the pressure rises OK, run the engine for about 15 minutes at various rpm until it is well warmed through. Shut down and check for oil leaks – particularly round the oil filter, magnetic plug and reservoir drain plug.
  • If all is OK, replace the engine cowlings and you’re ready for the next flight!